Political satire destined for Quorn

SATIRE: A special screening of the Sydney Theatre Company's 'The Wharf Review' will be brought to the region for the first time in the show's 15 year history. Photo: Country Arts SA.
SATIRE: A special screening of the Sydney Theatre Company's 'The Wharf Review' will be brought to the region for the first time in the show's 15 year history. Photo: Country Arts SA.

In the wake of a bizarre and long-winded state election campaign comes the Sydney Theatre Company’s The Wharf Review.

A special screening of the political satire will be screened at Emily’s Bistro this Friday commemorating the shows 15th anniversary.

In 21 shows the cast have mercilessly mocked all the usual political and celebrity suspects, serving up whitty satire through sketch, song and “sophisticated silliness”.

The Australian National Theatre (ANT) Live captured the presentation on film and co-director/writer Jonathan Biggins has been surprised with how well it has translated to screen.

“As the creators we were a bit nervous about going to see the screening … but we were very pleased and pleasantly surprised,” Mr Biggins explained.

“The audience in the cinema started acting as an audience in a theatre would – they were applauding sketches, they were laughing an awful lot and they really got into it.”

WHARF REVIEW: Jonathan and Amanada go Greek. Photo: Country Arts SA.

WHARF REVIEW: Jonathan and Amanada go Greek. Photo: Country Arts SA.

A show usually only seen in major capital cities, The Wharf Review is being brought to the region through the Country Arts SA’s Shows on the Road program. 

This is the first event scheduled for what Flinders Ranges Mayor, Peter Slattery, has labelled a big year in the arts.

“We’re excited to support this unique and entertaining show and it’s the first of many activities we are planning over the coming years,” Mr Slattery said.

“In July we will be hosting another Shows on the Road event.

“Acclaimed musician and performer Adam Page will be in the Flinders Ranges on July 7, 2018 for a one-night-only performance in the Quorn Town Hall.”

Screening on the eve of the South Australian election, The Wharf Review is set to provide some much needed comic relief. 

Mr Biggins has encouraged everyone to come along with an open mind to be “impressed by the essence of review”.

“That’s one of the great advantages of political satire, it does put the whole thing into perspective and it does act as a pressure relief for people who have been getting quite frustrated,” the co-director said.

“Obviously it won’t relate to the specific issues of the South Australian election, but I think it does have that function and you do need to bare in mind every now and then that its not all doom and gloom.”