Puyu Blasters visit Augusta Park Primary School

HAND-EYE COORDINATION: Augusta Park Primary School student Shane attempts to catch the ball thrown by Trent Wingard from the Puyu Blasters while wearing 'smoking goggles'.
HAND-EYE COORDINATION: Augusta Park Primary School student Shane attempts to catch the ball thrown by Trent Wingard from the Puyu Blasters while wearing 'smoking goggles'.

Students from Augusta Park Primary School were given a lesson in healthy eating habits and the dangers of smoking by the Puyu Blasters.

Representatives from the Puyu Blasters – a program formed by the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) –  spent two days interacting with students during the school’s Book Week celebrations.

Games, activities and visual presentations were used to teach students about the dangerous chemicals in cigarettes, as well as the health issues caused by smoking, including gangrene, visual impairment and cancer.

AHCSA Youth Project Officer Trent Wingard said the program aims to show the next generation that smoking is not cool.

“When I was growing up, I had no idea about toilet cleaner, nail polish and all the chemicals in cigarettes,” Mr Wingard said.

“These kids will go home and tell their parents. They’re the key messenger and the biggest reward from our program is kids going home to their parents and telling them ‘don’t smoke around me’.

“We put a big emphasis on second-hand smoking.”

Puyu Blasters deliver educational programs at schools across the state, promoting anti-tobacco and smoke-free environments.

Augusta Park Primary School Cultural Language Specialist Maoriella Stuart said the program was well received by the students.

“It was a great opportunity to show the kids about smoking,” she said. “They really loved it and we got a lot of positive feedback.”