Botanic Gardens Day celebration at the Australian Arid Lands

National Botanic Gardens Day celebration at the Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden.
National Botanic Gardens Day celebration at the Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden.

Port Augusta's Arid Lands will join hundreds of other botanic gardens across the country as they celebrate their important achievements in the field of plant conservation.

Botanic gardens are increasingly being recognised as the frontline in tackling the biggest challenges facing the planet's future - food security, pest and disease eradication and adaptation to a changing climate.

To highlight this work, botanic gardens from Australia and New Zealand are hosting their fourth Botanic Garden Day celebration on Sunday, May 26.

Arid Lands Manager Natalie Munns said all residents and visitors are invited to be apart of the celebrations.

"There will be a series of fun and engaging community activities throughout the day that will allow you to explore our beautiful garden and learn about some of the amazing plant conservation work we are doing at the Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden which is proudly owned and operated by the Port Augusta City Council," she said.

"By participating in Botanic Gardens Day you will be joining thousands of people from across the nation who will be visiting their local botanic garden, connecting with their neighbours and perhaps uncovering a new passion for protecting the plants that give us life."

Arid Lands Manager Natalie Munns, Arid Lands Tourism Officer Bernie Reichstein and Friends volunteer Chris Nayda pose with their bronze Ecotourism certificate.

Arid Lands Manager Natalie Munns, Arid Lands Tourism Officer Bernie Reichstein and Friends volunteer Chris Nayda pose with their bronze Ecotourism certificate.

Throughout the years the Arid Lands team have been involved in a number of plant conservation projects based on growing and educating about endangered native arid zone plants.

They have also worked with and provided a base for research projects including the University of Technology Sydney's research into thermal tolerance of native plants in a hot climate.

"We would love to share our passion and knowledge about protecting our native plant life with our local and extended community. It's projects like these across the nation that are making a real difference to the survival of plants in our country," she said.

"Visit the Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden on the last Sunday in May to celebrate with us and to learn how you can save the planet - one plant at time. And who knows, you may find your inner botanist."