Former high-profile William Tyrrell detective Gary Jubelin to front court on charges

Former high-profile homicide detective Gary Jubelin will front a Sydney court on July 30 on four charges.
Former high-profile homicide detective Gary Jubelin will front a Sydney court on July 30 on four charges.

High-profile NSW homicide detective Gary Jubelin will face four charges allegedly relating to illegal recordings made during the investigation into disappearance of missing boy William Tyrrell in a Sydney court on July 30.

Mr Jubelin is charged with four offences under the Surveillance Devices Act.

Following a number of complaints, the Professional Standards Command commenced an investigation in 2018 overseen by the Law Enforcement Conduct Commission, into the conduct of the officer during the course of his operational duties. Those inquiries disclosed a number of recordings allegedly made at locations in Parramatta and Kendall without a warrant.

Mr Jubelin will appear in the Downing Centre Local Court on Tuesday. He denies all wrongdoing.

The Chief Inspector sensationally quit the police in May, after being stood down pending the internal investigation.

Mr Jubelin has been with the force since 1985, and has been involved in a number of high-profile investigations including the Bowraville murders, the brutal killing of Michelle Leng and the death of mentally ill Sydney woman Courtney Topic.

He also worked on the murder of Sydney man Matthew Leveson, and led the team that found his body buried in the Royal National Park after a decade-long search.

The inquest into the disappearance of William Tyrrell continues in August.

The inquest into the disappearance of William Tyrrell continues in August.

A Change.org page We Stand with Gary Jubelin now has 11,600 supporters calling for all charges against the former Chief Inspector to be dropped.

The foster mother of William Tyrrell has also been outspoken saying there can be no complacency on the case by Strike Force Rosann and the good work of Mr Jubelin must continue.

Police Minister David Elliott said in May he had no concerns about the ongoing management of the Tyrrell investigation.

"I have the absolute confidence of the NSW Police Force to do a thorough investigation into any matter," he said.

Police Command has now put their "most senior homicide" investigator in charge - Detective Chief Inspector David Laidlaw.

More than 15,000 pieces of evidence have been collected by Strike Force Rosann which is made up of 30 of the best officers from across the state.

An inquest into the disappearance of William will continue in August.

Persons of interest are expected to be called to give evidence at the inquest which is being heard before Deputy State Coroner Harriet Grahame.

The inquest will continue on August 4.