Caroline: Midwife of the 'century'

MILESTONE: Proud mum Nikita Treloar and Aboriginal and Maternal Infant Care worker Caroline Dalgetty with her 100th delivery Darnell Amos.
MILESTONE: Proud mum Nikita Treloar and Aboriginal and Maternal Infant Care worker Caroline Dalgetty with her 100th delivery Darnell Amos.

Caroline Dalgetty proved she has one of the safest sets of hands in Port Augusta after delivering her 100th baby this week.

Caroline has been an Aboriginal and Maternal Infant Care worker with the Anangu Bibi Birthing Program (ABBP) for 10 years.

She said her 100th delivery is just as special as the first.

"It's always a good feeling, especially because you've been there with the mum throughout the whole pregnancy," Caroline said.

The milestone birth went off without a hitch, but to Caroline the experience is always memorable.

"We've had a few quick ones, They always get you!" she laughed.

"We've had a few laughs and giggles in there, but there are some not so good ones where there's some sorrow and grief. They are sometimes hard to get past, but then you get the really lovely ones like this morning."

Proud mum Nikita Treloar shares a special bond with Caroline, who has delivered three of her four children.

"She has been there and seen them all grow up and did her best for them that she could," Nikita said.

"Port Augusta is a small town so we see each other here and there. She always asks how the kids are going."

The team at Port Augusta Hospital celebrated Caroline's milestone with a special cake.

The team at Port Augusta Hospital celebrated Caroline's milestone with a special cake.

The ABBP program started in 2004 it was identified that many local Aboriginal women were not engaging with traditional antenatal care, leading to low birth weights and poorer health outcome

The pilot consisted of just 20 clients.

Four years later, the hospital secured funding to extend the program to all Aboriginal women and it has been going strong ever since.

The team now sees up to 100 births per year.

Caroline said continuity of care is the key to success.

"You get to know the women and what they want and need, and you get to know the families as well," she said.

"They have the same AMIC worker throughout the pregnancy, labour, birth and then postnatally as well.

"As Aboriginal women, we know what the women need in the labour ward room and try to keep it culturally appropriate and sensitive."

Caroline looks forward to delivering more babies in the future.