Dermody's final donation to the RSL

MEMORABILIA: Colin King and Geoff Kohler from the Port Augusta Returned and Services League with Dave Dermody's war grave plaque.
MEMORABILIA: Colin King and Geoff Kohler from the Port Augusta Returned and Services League with Dave Dermody's war grave plaque.

Dave Dermody is a decorated Australian Veteran.

His picture hangs in the Port Augusta RSL museum alongside a distinguished history of service to his country.

He was born in Port Lincoln, but spent his twilight years in Port Augusta - even cutting the ribbon at the official RSL museum opening.

Sadly Dermody passed away in 2009, but this week another piece of his legacy was added to the impressive collection of memorabilia.

It was a plaque from the Office of Australian War Graves.

The plaque was delivered by his brother Colin King, who toured the museum with his Tea Tree Gully Probus group.

"I'm very proud of him. He had a hard life," Mr King said.

"With the council here they have to keep a certain uniform at the cemetery where he is buried, unfortunately the plaque doesn't fall into that format so we offered it to the RSL and they are happy to have it."

Tea Tree Gully Probus Group toured the Port Augusta RSL museum during their stay in the Far North.

Tea Tree Gully Probus Group toured the Port Augusta RSL museum during their stay in the Far North.

In 1955 18-year-old Dermody joined the Australian Regular Army.

His first posting as a Private was with the Royal Australian Regiment and after that he was sent overseas for active service in Malaysia during the communist uprising in 1957.

After a well-earned break he was posted to Borneo and Singapore in 1962-63 where he gained his first stripes and was promoted to Lance Corporal.

He returned to Australian soil once again with another promotion in tow, Sergeant.

Dermody began training with the elite SAS Commando unit and climbed the ranks once more to Warrant Officer 2.

With his Special Forces Training and seasoned military combat experience, he was sent to Vietnam.

His first tour was in 1966-67 and his second tour started in 1970 where Dermody, as Platoon Leader, nearly lost his life.

He was ambushed by a Mortar Bomb attack and received shrapnel wounds to all parts of his body.

Dave Dermody's photo hangs proudly in the Port Augusta RSL museum.

Dave Dermody's photo hangs proudly in the Port Augusta RSL museum.

Dermody retired in 1985 after training young Australian Diggers for 15-years.

"After he came back from Vietnam, where got shot up, he was in the hospital for three months and then he came back home," Mr King said.

"He had a stroke when he was living in Byron. My sister and brother-in-law went and picked him up and brought him back here.

"He lost his leg but other than that he was pretty mobile. He ended up getting his driver's license back, although everyone who knew him knew to steer clear."

The Port Augusta museum is one of the largest and most impressive memorabilia rooms in the region, containing artifacts from the Boer War through to present day combat.