Baby-care boost for Port Augusta Hospital

AMIC worker Caroline Dalgetty, patient Gayle Scotchmer and AMIC worker Kristen Besant with the new equipment at the Port Augusta Hospital.
AMIC worker Caroline Dalgetty, patient Gayle Scotchmer and AMIC worker Kristen Besant with the new equipment at the Port Augusta Hospital.

New equipment donated to the Port Augusta Hospital has brought the birthing ward in line with its Adelaide counterparts.

The Humpty Dumpty Foundation has answered the calls from Port Augusta Hospital and Regional Health's frontline with the donation of an Infant Resusciataire valued at $39,070 for the Casuarina Ward.

Immediate access to the Infant Resuscitaire is vital to allow clinical staff to respond to neonatal emergencies.

It can be moved to where it is needed in a life-threatening situation and enables care to be given to a baby in a thermally stable environment with quick and convenient access for staff.

It also provides an integrated ventilator for respiratory support for sick or premature babies.

Nurse Unit Manger Jenny Bury welcomed the donation.

"It's just really refreshing they are looking at rural areas and topping us up with state-of-the-art equipment because they are very popular and very good equipment," she said.

"The nursing staff are using the same equipment from the birthing areas, to the birthing suit and then into the nursery, so it's consistent and they aren't having to learn different pieces of equipment."

To date, Humpty has raised over $70m and in 2019, Humpty provided close to 450 pieces of medical equipment for Paediatric Wards, Neonatal Units, Maternity and Emergency Departments.

The Foundation provides equipment for about 20,000 children who are in hospital any day Humpty Dumpty Executive Chairman Paul Francis acknowledged the generosity of Australian donors.

"Now, more than ever, hospitals and healthcare services need Humpty's help and it is important we continue our critical work of providing essential and often life-saving medical equipment to metropolitan and regional areas such as Port Augusta to ease the load on our frontline professionals," he said.