South Australia's premier will be formally asked to launch a royal commission into indigenous corporations

VOICE: Mark Koolmatrie will be convener of the group seeking government action.
VOICE: Mark Koolmatrie will be convener of the group seeking government action.

Indigenous leaders will make a last-ditch formal attempt to persuade the South Australian government to order a royal commission into Aboriginal corporations.

Premier Steven Marshall has agreed to see the group, led by Mark Koolmatrie, in Adelaide on Friday, October 16, to hear their case as outlined by a Senior Counsel.

Sources say Mr Marshall may agree to the plea, but the verdict is unknown at this stage.

The submission comes after the Canberra-based Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations put two Port Augusta-based Aboriginal corporations into special administration this year.

It also follows demands by an action group for access to financial records of the Adnyamathanha Traditional Lands Association, based at Port Augusta and which is one of the groups under administration.

The association receives millions of dollars in royalties from the Beverley uranium mine in the outback.

Indigenous leaders say problems with Native Title corporations exist around the nation. They have called also for a federal royal commission.

CONCERN: Port Augusta's Charlie Jackson is concerned about the administration of Aboriginal corporations.

CONCERN: Port Augusta's Charlie Jackson is concerned about the administration of Aboriginal corporations.

Mr Koolmatrie, of Noarlunga, south of Adelaide, is a community leader and will be the convener of the approach to the Premier.

"We will highlight problems and talk to the Premier about what he sees as solutions. He is a friend of many of the people who will attend the meeting," he said.,

"The message is that there are concerns at the way things are happening.

"There is a better way of doing business. We want to find out about what 'empowerment' really means.

"We want to see the financial records of the Adnyamathanha association."

Mr Koolmatrie said the group was feeling confident of the outcome of their plea.

"We expect the government to do something about high-level problems in our community," he said.

Aboriginal Reform Group of South Australia and Adnyamathanha elder Charlie Jackson, of Port Augusta, said some members were appointed as directors of corporations without knowing their rights and responsibilities.

"If you don't know your role as a board member, that is going to cause conflict for you and for the organisation," he said.

"We want the government to instigate a royal commission into Aboriginal corporations throughout SA.

"There are major problems in these organisations."

The newspaper is seeking comment from the Premier's office.

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