REAL AUSTRALIA

Voice of Regional Australia: When a quiet dignity is way beyond expectation

Voice of Real Australia is a regular newsletter from ACM, which has journalists in every state and territory. Sign up here to get it by email, or here to forward it to a friend.

The Victoria River in the Northern Territory - where quiet dignity came in handy. Photo: file

The Victoria River in the Northern Territory - where quiet dignity came in handy. Photo: file

There's something quite admirable about quiet dignity.

These are the people who face challenges - of whatever nature and whatever degree - with a calm determination, invariably with a distinct lack of fanfare and a respectful understanding of the consequences of their actions.

Then there's the rest of us who, again to whatever degree, roam about pointlessly, jazz hands flying, screaming like banshees. Of course there are shades of grey.

But on the quiet dignity front take a peek at video on this Katherine Times article.

Trent de With was fishing for barramundi when, instead, he hooked a crocodile. A bloody big crocodile at that!

Yet, in the video (which yes, if you're cynical, could have been heavily edited - though I suspect not) you would actually never know. Well, unless you failed to notice the tiny rod being bent relentlessly to snapping point, you'd barely know there was a potential man-eater on the end of the line.

So that's one sort of quiet dignity, the one displayed by one WA couple is something else again.

Jenna Lantouris and Charley Alderman hold their baby Kora in hospital.

Jenna Lantouris and Charley Alderman hold their baby Kora in hospital.

Jenna Lantouris and Charley Alderman were mentally prepared to have their first child. They weren't prepared for arranging her funeral.

Kora, who was stillborn less than three weeks before her due date. She died from a true knot in the umbilical cord.

October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month, and that has prompted the couple to speak openly. Yet ever day, there are six still births across the country - more than 40 every week.

We shouldn't mistake quiet dignity for disinterest or a casual lack of concern. Sometimes it's just what it takes to get through.

In case you are interested in filtering your pandemic coverage down to just twice a day, why not sign up for The Informer newsletter?

More stuff happening around Australia ...

Sign up to get our Voice of Real Australia updates straight to your inbox