Water main upgrades flowing across the Far North

UPGRADES: Water mains are now generally upgraded with PVC due to their greater flexibility and resistance to ground movement. Photo: SA Water

UPGRADES: Water mains are now generally upgraded with PVC due to their greater flexibility and resistance to ground movement. Photo: SA Water

Water main upgrades are flowing across the Far North as part of SA Water's $155 million investment in improving water services for outback communities.

Orroroo, Quorn and Stirling North have been earmarked for a total of around 2,300 metres of new water mains, which are set for installation during the next 12 months.

SA Water's General Manager Asset Operations and Delivery Amanda Lewry said the upgrades will ensure the long-term reliability of essential water services.

"A reliable supply of water is central to protecting public health and underpins economic growth, and by investing in our water network, we're enhancing the delivery of services that support the prosperity of our communities and businesses," Ms Lewry said.

"Our upgrades across the Far North are only a few of many in the pipeline for this year and we look forward to continuing our investment in communities right across the state."

More than 30,000 metres of pipe will be replaced throughout regional South Australia this financial year, with the upgrades an important component of SA Water's four-year, $1.6 billion capital program.

Reticulated water mains, which connect larger distribution mains to customers' service pipes, traditionally have a lifespan of approximately 100 years and range from 80 to 375 millimetres in diameter.

Cast iron and fibro-cement water mains are now replaced with PVC pipes, due to their greater flexibility and resistance to ground movement.

"South Australia's climate and environmental factors like soil movement can make it challenging to prevent leaks and breaks from occurring, but we're adopting modern materials and practices to limit their frequency and impact," Ms Lewry said.

"Our program also includes the installation of an additional 250 network valves in regional areas to help minimise the number of customers affected when parts of the network are isolated for repairs.

"As work progresses at pace, we will ensure local residents are kept informed of work and any temporary interruptions to their water supply that are necessary when we move their connections over to their new water main."